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Annual Report to Parliament on the Administration of the Privacy Act 2013–2014

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Table of Contents

Introduction

Purpose of the Privacy Act

History of the Department of Finance Canada

The Department Today

Mandate of the Department of Finance Canada

Strategic Outcome

Administration of the Privacy Act

Information Holdings

Interpretation of Statistical Report (Annex A)

Complaints/Investigations/Audits

Appeals to the Federal Court of Canada

Monitoring of Requests

Material Privacy Breaches

Privacy Impact Assessments

ANNEX A – Statistical Report on Privacy Act Requests

Introduction

The Annual Report to Parliament on the Administration of the Privacy Act (the Act) within the Department of Finance Canada is prepared and tabled in Parliament in accordance with section 72 of the Act and covers the period from April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2014.

Purpose of the Privacy Act

The Act came into force on July 1, 1983. Its purpose is to protect the privacy of individuals with respect to personal information about themselves held by federal government institutions. It also provides Canadian citizens, permanent residents, and individuals present in Canada a right of access to their personal information.

The Department recognizes that the right of access to personal information is an essential element of our system of democracy. It is committed to openness and transparency, respecting both the spirit and the requirements of the Act, its regulations and related policy instruments. The Department further acknowledges the importance of facilitating access to information by requiring that its employees make every reasonable effort to assist applicants.

History of the Department of Finance Canada

In 1867, Canada became a self-governing dominion, comprising New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec. The first Minister of Finance, Alexander Galt, had previously served in the same capacity for the Province of Canada (made up of parts of present-day Ontario, Quebec and Labrador).

The Department of Finance was one of the original departments of the Government of Canada. Others included Agriculture, the Penitentiary Service, Public Works, Post Office, Secretary of State, and the Privy Council Office. Originally, the Department of Finance's primary functions were bookkeeping, administering the collection and disbursement of public monies, and servicing the national debt. The total number of officers, clerks, and messengers in the Department in 1867 was twenty-eight.

In June 1869, John Rose, who succeeded Alexander Galt as Finance Minister, introduced a statute spelling out the Department's duties, which were basically doing everything not assigned to any other department.

At various times since its establishment, the Department has done the work of the Treasury Board Secretariat, the Comptroller of the Treasury, the Royal Canadian Mint and the Canadian International Trade Tribunal, as well as taking charge of tax inspection and old age and public service pensions.

During World War I, the federal government borrowed from, and taxed, individual Canadians directly for the first time, through Victory Loans and income tax, which was introduced in 1917.

In the early 1930s the Government transferred detailed operational and program responsibilities to other departments or agencies, so the Department of Finance could concentrate on essential analytical and policy work.

In 1939, departmental officials developed a new approach to the federal budget. Instead of simply attempting to balance expenditures with revenues, they began to use taxing powers and spending policies to influence economic development in general.

During World War II, Canadian Gross National Product (GNP) doubled and annual federal spending increased to 10 times that of the 1939 figure, significantly increasing the influence of the department. Much of that influence was exercised through its budgets.

Canada's first Budget, tabled on December 7, 1867, showed $7.4 million in receipts and $5.3 million in expenditures. The shortest interval between Budgets was four months (June 18, 1971 to October 14, 1971). The longest was 16 months (February 25, 1937 to June 16, 1938).

In the early years, the Budget consisted simply of a speech by the Finance Minister in the House of Commons, which was recorded by hand in Hansard. Newspaper reporters sitting in the Press Gallery made notes on the speech, from which they wrote their stories. The Department did not provide the media with special Budget documentation or briefings. By the 1960s, copies of the Budget speech were produced on an ink-fed duplicating machine and collated by hand in the Minister's office. This document was given to reporters as the Minister began his speech.

The Department Today

Today, the Department helps the Government of Canada develop and implement strong and sustainable economic, fiscal, tax, social, security, international and financial sector policies and programs. It plays an important central agency role, working with other departments to ensure that the government’s agenda is carried out and that ministers are supported with high-quality analysis and advice. It does so as one of the Government of Canada's smallest departments, with fewer than 1,000 people working in its ten branches:

  • Economic and Fiscal Policy
  • Economic Development and Corporate Finance
  • Federal-Provincial Relations and Social Policy
  • Financial Sector Policy
  • International Trade and Finance
  • Tax Policy
  • Law
  • Corporate Services
  • Consultations and Communications
  • Internal Audit and Evaluation

The Department’s responsibilities include:

  • Preparing the federal Budget and the Update of Economic and Fiscal Projections;
  • Preparing the Annual Financial Report of the Government of Canada and, in cooperation with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat and the Receiver General for Canada, the Public Accounts of Canada;
  • Developing tax and tariff policy and legislation;
  • Managing federal borrowing on financial markets;
  • Designing and administering major transfers of federal funds to the provinces and territories;
  • Developing financial sector policy and legislation; and
  • Representing Canada in various international financial institutions and groups.

Mandate of the Department of Finance Canada

The Department of Finance Canada is established under section 14 of the Financial Administration Act. Under section 15 of that Act, The Minister of Finance “has the management and direction of the Department, the management of the Consolidated Revenue Fund and the supervision, control and direction of all matters relating to the financial affairs of Canada not by law assigned to the Treasury Board or to any other minister.” Certain other authorities have been entrusted to the Minister of Finance through various Acts of Parliament, including the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act, the Income Tax Act, the Excise Tax Act, the Canada Business Corporations Act, and the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act.

The Department of Finance Canada contributes to a strong economy and sound public finances for Canadians. It does so by monitoring developments in Canada and around the world to provide first-rate analysis and advice to the Government of Canada and by developing and implementing fiscal and economic policies that support the economic and social goals of Canada and its people. The Department also plays a central role in ensuring that government spending is focused on results and delivers value for taxpayer dollars. The Department interacts extensively with other federal organizations and acts as an effective conduit for the views of participants in the economy from all parts of Canada.

The Department’s most visible output is the federal budget. The budget speech provides an authoritative review of past, present, and future economic factors that will affect Canada’s economic performance and finances. The budget reviews government accounts for the past period and presents its fiscal projections for the coming years including the government’s expenditure program, revenues from existing sources, taxation changes, and debt levels.

Strategic Outcome

The Department of Finance Canada provides effective economic leadership with a clear focus in 2013-2014 on one strategic outcome, which expressed a long-term and enduring benefit for Canadians:

A strong economy and sound public finances for Canadians

The Department has four programs, each of which consists of a varying number of sub-programs. The four programs are Economic and Fiscal Policy Framework, Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs, Treasury and Financial Affairs, and Internal Services.

The Economic and Fiscal Policy Framework program is the primary source of advice and recommendations to the Minister of Finance on issues, policies and programs of the Government of Canada in the areas of economic, fiscal and social policy; federal-provincial relations; financial affairs; taxation; and international trade and finance.

The Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs support provinces and territories with funding for health and social programs. Through transfer payments, this program activity enables less prosperous provincial governments to provide their residents with public services that are reasonably comparable to those in other provinces, at reasonably comparable levels of taxation, and provides territorial governments with funding to support public services, in recognition of the higher cost of providing programs and services in the North. This program also includes the collection and remittance of provincial, territorial and aboriginal taxes under tax collection and administration agreements.

The Treasury and Financial Affairs program manages debt operations and other financial operations of the Government of Canada.

The Internal Services program includes a number of functions and resources that support the Department as a whole in achieving its strategic outcome.

Administration of the Privacy Act

Access to Information and Privacy Division

The Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Division is part of the Law Branch and is responsible for administering the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act for the Department of Finance Canada. As a centralized operation, the ATIP Division coordinates the timely processing of requests under the legislation, handles complaints lodged with the Privacy Commissioner, and responds to informal inquiries. Division staff also provides guidance to departmental officials on matters involving the Act. The ATIP Division comprises a director, two team leaders, nine full-time ATIP analysts and two administrative assistants.

Principles on Assistance to Applicants

With the passing of the Federal Accountability Act, section 4(2.1) was added to the Access to Information Act:

“The head of a government institution shall, without regard to the identity of a person making a request for access to a record under the control of the institution, make every reasonable effort to assist the person in connection with the request, respond to the request accurately and completely and, subject to the regulations, provide timely access to the record in the format requested.”

While a similar provision was not included in the Privacy Act, the Department is nonetheless committed to both the spirit and intent of these principles and to the Directive on Privacy Requests and Correction of Personal Information with respect to their application when processing Privacy Act requests.

Educational and Training Activities

This year, the ATIP Division participated in two Orientation Sessions. These are provided to employees who are new to the Department as a means to introduce them to the activities of each Branch. It also provided information about the ATIP Division, the Act, and information management practices to 34 new employees.

The Department’s Learning and Development team continued to assist the ATIP Division in providing monthly ATIP training sessions to departmental employees. In the early spring, a training schedule was posted on the intranet site which outlined all of the sessions to be given in 2013-2014. This reporting year, a total of 21 employees attended sessions given on:

  • an overview of the Access to Information Act;
  • “Openness, Transparency, and Discretion”.

Ad hoc training on a variety of subjects was also provided as needed to individuals throughout the Department including to ATIP branch contacts. 

For many years ATIP offices have been required by policy to consult with the Office of the Counsel to the Clerk of the Privy Council where possible Cabinet confidences fall under the ambit of a request made under the Act. However, effective July 1, 2013, ATIP offices must instead consult with their departmental legal services unit (DLSU) which, as legal advisors, confirms whether the Cabinet confidence exclusion applies.

In order to develop a solid knowledge base with respect to Cabinet confidences, the ATIP Division ensured that all ATIP personnel and all DLSU personnel involved in the process received training from a subject matter expert. Sessions were provided in July and September 2013 to a total of 28 ATIP and DLSU personnel.

Institutional Changes to the Administration of the Act

One change concerning the administration of the Act took place within the Department this reporting year. As previously noted, ATIP offices must now consult with their DLSU’s for the confirmation of Cabinet confidences.

Delegation of Authority

The delegation of authority that was approved on March 31, 2008 remained in effect throughout the reporting period. A new Minister was appointed in March 2014, and the delegation order will be updated accordingly. The authority to approve or deny the release of information under the Act is shared by the Deputy Minister, the Associate Deputy Minister and G7 Deputy for Canada, the Associate Deputy Minister, the Assistant Deputy Minister and Counsel to the Department, and the ATIP Director. The ATIP Director normally performs the function, with the exception of disclosures pursuant to paragraph 8(2)(e) of the Act, which are usually handled by the Assistant Deputy Minister of the Corporate Services Branch.

Access to Information Act Designation Order. For details, refer to the preceding paragraph.

SCHEDULE 2
Designation Order—Privacy Act
Powers, Duties or Functions Section Deputy Minister Associate DM Associate DM and
G7 Deputy for Canada
Assistant DM, Corporate Services Branch
To disclose personal information to an investigative body specified in the regulations, on the written request of the body, for the purpose of enforcing any law of Canada or a province or carrying out a lawful investigation, if the request specifies the purpose and describes the information to be disclosed 8(2)(e) yes yes yes yes
SCHEDULE 2
Designation Order—Privacy Act
Powers, Duties or Functions Section Deputy Minister Associate DM Associate DM and G7 Deputy for Canada ADM and Counsel,
Law Branch
Director, ATIP ATIP Team Leader,
Senior ATIP Analyst
To disclose personal information when satisfied that the purpose for which the information is disclosed cannot reasonably be accomplished unless the information is provided in a form that identifies the person to whom it relates and to obtain a written undertaking that no subsequent disclosure of the information will be made in a form that could reasonably be expected to identify the individual to whom it relates 8(2)(j) yes yes yes yes yes no
To disclose personal information when public interest outweighs invasion of privacy or when disclosure benefits the individual 8(2)(m) yes yes yes yes yes no
To keep copies of requests made under 8(2)(e), keep records of information disclosed pursuant to such requests and make those copies and records available to the Privacy Commissioner 8(4) yes yes yes yes yes yes
To notify the Privacy Commissioner in writing of disclosure under paragraph 8(2)(m) 8(5) yes yes yes yes yes no
To retain a record of use of personal information 9(1) yes yes yes yes yes yes
To notify the Privacy Commissioner of consistent use of personal information and update index accordingly 9(4) yes yes yes yes yes yes
To include personal information in personal information banks 10 yes yes yes yes yes yes
To give written notice as to whether or not access will be given 14(a) yes yes yes yes yes no
To give access to requester 14(b) yes yes yes yes yes no
To extend time limit and give notice of extension 15 yes yes yes yes yes yes
To determine the necessity for a translation or interpretation of a record 17(2)(b) yes yes yes yes yes yes
To determine whether a record should be provided in an alternative format 17(3) yes yes yes yes yes yes
To refuse to disclose personal information referred to in that section 18(2) yes yes yes yes yes no
To refuse to disclose personal information referred to in that section 19(1) yes yes yes yes yes no
To disclose, with consent, personal information referred to in that subsection 19(2) yes yes yes yes yes no
To refuse to disclose personal information referred to in that section 20 yes yes yes yes yes no
To refuse to disclose personal information referred to in that section 21 yes yes yes yes yes no
To refuse to disclose personal information referred to in that section 22 yes yes yes yes yes no
To refuse to disclose personal information referred to in that section 22.3 yes yes yes yes yes no
To refuse to disclose personal information referred to in that section 23 yes yes yes yes yes no
To refuse to disclose personal information under that section 24 yes yes yes yes yes no
To refuse to disclose personal information under that section 25 yes yes yes yes yes no
To refuse to disclose personal information under that section 26 yes yes yes yes yes no
To refuse to disclose personal information under that section 27 yes yes yes yes yes no
To refuse to disclose personal information under that section 28 yes yes yes yes yes no
To receive notice of investigation by the
Privacy Commissioner
31 yes yes yes yes yes no
To make representations to the Privacy Commissioner 33(2) yes yes yes yes yes yes
To receive the report of findings of the investigation and give notice of action taken or proposed to be taken or reasons why no action has been or is proposed to be taken 35(1) yes yes yes yes yes yes
To provide access to personal information 35(4) yes yes yes yes yes no
To receive the report of findings of the investigation of files in exempt banks 36(3) yes yes yes yes yes yes
To receive the report of findings after investigation in respect of personal information 37(3) yes yes yes yes yes yes
To request that the matter be heard and determined in the National Capital Region 51(2)(b) yes yes yes yes yes yes
To request the opportunity to make representations ex parte 51(3) yes yes yes yes yes yes
To prepare annual report for submission to Parliament 72(1) yes yes yes yes yes yes
To carry out responsibilities conferred on the head of the institution by regulations made under section 77, not included above 77 yes yes yes yes yes yes

Information Holdings

Info Source is a series of publications containing information about and collected by the Government of Canada. The primary purpose of Info Source is to assist individuals in exercising their rights under the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act. Info Source also supports the federal government's commitment to facilitate access to information regarding its activities.

A description of the Department’s functions, programs, activities and related information holdings can be found in Sources of Federal Government and Employee Information. Info Source also provides private individuals and federal government employees (current and former) with the information required to access their personal information held by government institutions that are subject to the Privacy Act.

During this reporting period, the ATIP Division re-organized the content of its Info Source chapters, including the descriptions of its information holdings, by institutional functions, programs and activities. The Department’s chapter is now laid out in line with the Department’s Program Alignment Architecture. Under this approach, all classes of records and personal information banks are directly linked to the relevant institutional program and/or activity.

All Info Source publications are available free of charge on the Internet.

Interpretation of Statistical Report (Annex A)

Part 1 – Requests under the Privacy Act

The Department received five Privacy Act requests this reporting year, the same amount received in 2012-2013. No requests were carried over from 2012-2013. All five requests were closed by the end of the fiscal year.

Table 1 illustrates a three-year trend.

Table 1. Overview of Privacy Act Requests
Fiscal Year New Requests Received Requests Completed Number of Pages Processed Number of Pages Released On-Time Compliance Rate
%
2013–2014 5 5 6 6 100
2012-2013 5 5 112 112 100
2011–2012 13 13 252 217 99.98

Part 2 – Requests Closed During the Reporting Period

Disposition / Completion Time

Many individuals who submit Privacy Act requests are under the impression that the Department holds the same type and amount of personal information about them as is held by the Canada Revenue Agency, banks, and trust companies. That is not the case and explains why many requests do not result in the retrieval of personal information about those individuals. The following table indicates the disposition of the five completed requests this fiscal:

Disposition of Requests During the Reporting Reporting Period
Disposition Number of Requests Percentage of Requests
All disclosed 2 40.0%
Disclosed in part 0 0%
All exempted 0 0%
All excluded 0 0%
No records exist 3 60.0%
Request abandoned 0 0%
Total 5 100.0%

Disclosed in Full

In two instances, the personal information requested was provided to the individuals in its entirety. A total of 6 pages were provided.

Of the five requests received, four were closed in less than 15 days and one request required less than 30 days to complete.

Exemptions / Exclusions

No exemptions or exclusions were claimed.

Format of Information Released

In the two cases where personal information was released, it was provided to the individuals in paper format.

Complexity

None of the requests were complex. In the two cases where personal information existed, a total of 6 pages were processed and all of the information was released.

Deemed Refusals

All requests were responded to within the statutory time frames set out in the Act.

Translations

There were no requests for translation this reporting period. 

Part 3 – Disclosures Under Subsection 8(2)

Paragraph 8(2)(e) of the Act allows for disclosures of personal information “to an investigative body…for the purpose of enforcing any law.” The Department did not make any disclosures pursuant to paragraph 8(2)(e) of the Act in this reporting period.

Paragraph 8(2)(m) of the Act allows for disclosures of personal information in the public interest.  The Department did not make any disclosures pursuant to paragraph 8(2)(m) of the Act in this reporting period.

Part 4 – Requests for Correction of Personal Information and Notations

No requests for corrections or notations were received from applicants this reporting period.

Part 5 – Extensions

No extensions of the statutory time limits under the Act were taken.

Part 6 – Consultations

No consultations were received from other government institutions or other organizations.

Part 7 – Completion Time of Consultations on Cabinet Confidences

No consultations with respect to Cabinet confidences were required.

Part 8 – Resources Related to the Privacy Act

Costs incurred in the reporting period are calculated on the salaries of ATIP Division staff and the administrative expenses associated with administration of the Act. Costs do not include salaries of other departmental personnel involved in processing requests. Administration of the Act cost the Department $13,887 this reporting year.

Complaints/Investigations/Audits

No complaints, investigations or audits were received or conducted this reporting period.

Appeals to the Federal Court of Canada

No appeals were made to the Federal Court.

Monitoring of Requests

Due to the small amount of requests processed by the Department under the Act, including corrections or notations, monitoring of requests is conducted within the ATIP Division on a weekly basis or on as a required basis in order to ensure that the Department meets its legislated obligations.

Material Privacy Breaches

There were no material privacy breaches which occurred this reporting period.

Privacy Impact Assessments

The Department initiated and completed a Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) of the Venture Capital Action Plan which was announced by the Prime Minister and the Minister of Finance on January 14, 2013. The Department of Finance is the lead federal government institution responsible for the implementation of the Plan which makes funds available for large private sector-led funds of funds. The PIA demonstrated that few privacy risks were associated with the program and that the mitigation strategies in place are appropriate. A summary of the PIA can be found on the Department of Finance website.

ANNEX A - Statistical Report on Privacy Act Requests

Name of institution: Department of Finance Canada
Reporting period: April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2014

PART 1 – Requests Under the Privacy Act

PART 1 – Requests Under the Privacy Act
Requests under the Privacy Act Number of Requests
Received during reporting period 5
Outstanding from previous reporting period 0
Total 5
Closed during reporting period 5
Carried over to next reporting period 0

PART 2 – Requests Closed During the Reporting Period

2.1 Disposition and Completion Time
Disposition of requests Completion Time
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
All disclosed 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2
Disclosed in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
No records exist 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
Request abandonned 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

 

2.2 Exemptions
Section Number of Requests
18(2) 0
19(1)(a) 0
19(1)(b) 0
19(1)(c) 0
19(1)(d) 0
19(1)(e) 0
19(1)(f) 0
20 0
21 0
22(1)(a)(i) 0
22(1)(a)(ii) 0
22(1)(a)(iii) 0
22(1)(b) 0
22(1)(c) 0
22.1 0
22.2 0
22.3 0
23(a) 0
23(b) 0
24(a) 0
24(b) 0
25 0
26 0
27 0
28 0

 

2.3 Exclusions
Section Number of Requests
69(1)(a) 0
69(1)(b) 0
69.1 0
70(1)(a) 0
70(1)(b) 0
70(1)(c) 0
70(1)(d) 0
70(1)(e) 0
70(1)(f) 0
70.1 0

 

2.4 Format of Information Released
Disposition Paper Electronic Other formats
All disclosed 2 0 0
Disclosed in part 0 0 0
Total 2 0 0

2.5 Complexity

2.5.1 Relevant Pages Processed and Disclosed
Disposition of requests Number of pages processed Number of pages disclosed Number of requests
All disclosed 6 6 2
Disclosed in part 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0
Request abandonned 0 0 0

 

2.5.2 Relevant Pages Processed and Disclosed by Size of Requests
Disposition of requests Less than 100 pages processed
101-500 pages
processed

501-1000 pages processed
1001-5000 pages processed
More than 5000 pages processed
Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed
All disclosed 2 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Abandonned 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 2 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

 

2.5.3 Other Complexities
Disposition Consultation required Legal Advice Sought Interwoven Information Other Total
All disclosed 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 0 0 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0
Abandonned 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0

2.6 Deemed Refusals

2.6.1 Disposition and Completion Time
Number of requests closed past
the statutory deadline
Principal Reason
Worload External consultation Internal consultation Other
0 0 0 0 0

 

2.6.2 Number of Days Past Deadline
Number of days past deadline Number of requests past deadline
where no extension was taken
Number of requests past deadline
where an extension was taken
Total
1 to 15 days 0 0 0
16 to 30 days 0 0 0
31 to 60 days 0 0 0
61 to 120 days 0 0 0
121 to 180 days 0 0 0
181 to 365 days 0 0 0
More than 365 days 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0

 

2.7 Requests for Translation
Translation Requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French 0 0 0
French to English 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0

PART 3 – Disclosures Under Subsection 8(2)

Disclosures Under Subsection 8(2)
Paragraph 8(2)(e) Paragraph 8(2)(m) Total
0 0 0

PART 4 – Requests for Correction of Personal Information and Notations

Requests for Correction of Personal Information and Notations
  Number
Request for correction received 0
Request for correction accepted 0
Request for correction refused 0
Notations attached 0

PART 5 – Extensions

5.1 Reasons for Extensions and Disposition of Requests
Disposition of requests where
an extension was taken
15(a)(i)
Interference with operations
15(a)(ii)
Consultation

15(b)
Translation or conversion
Section 70 Other
All disclosed 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 0 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0
No records exist 0 0 0 0
Request abandonned 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0

 

5.2 Length of Extensions
Length of extensions 15(a)(i)
Interference with operations
15(a)(ii)
Consultation

15(b)
Translation purposes
Section 70 Other
1 to 15 days 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 days 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0

PART 6 – Consultations Received from Other Institutions and Organizations

6.1 Consultations Received from Other Institutions and Organizations
Consultations Other governement institutions Number of pages to review Other organizations Number of pages to review
Received during reporting period 0 0 0 0
Outsanding from the previous reporting period 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0
Closed during the reporting period 0 0 0 0
Pending at the end of the reporting period 0 0 0 0

 

6.2 Recommendations and Completion Time for Consultations Received from Other Governement Institutions
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
Disclose entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclose in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

 

6.3 Recommendations and Completion Time for Consultations Received from Other Organizations
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
Disclose entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclose in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

PART 7 – Completion Time of Consultations on Cabinet Confidences

Completion Time of Consultations on Cabinet Confidences
Number of days Number of responses received Number of responses received past deadline
1 to 15 0 0
16 to 30 0 0
31 to 60 0 0
61 to 120 0 0
121 to 180 0 0
181 to 365 0 0
More than 365 0 0
Total 0 0

PART 8 – Resources Related to the Privacy Act

8.1 Costs
Expenditures Amount
Salaries $9,880
Overtime $0
Goods and Services $4,007
• Contracts for privacy impact assessments $0
• Professional services contracts $0
• Other $4,007
Total $13,887

 

8.2 Human Resources
Resources Dedicated full-time Dedicated part-time Total
Full-time employees 0.05 0.00 0.05
Part-time and casual employees 0.00 0.00 0.00
Regional staff 0.00 0.00 0.00
Consultants and agency personnel 0.00 0.00 0.00
Students 0.00 0.00 0.00
Total 0.05 0.00 0.05